The Prince Review

Do you love travel, mysteries, intrigue, cute guys, and spies? Then you will LOVE The Prince by Jillian Dodd!

the-prince

 

Summary:

 

Raised as an adept assassin at an elite, top secret academy for spies in training, X is at the top of her class. Determined to be the best in order to someday exact revenge against the shadowy man who murdered her mother, X will stop at nothing to make him pay. She pushes herself harder, and forces herself to be tougher, since nothing can get in the way of her ultimate personal goal- kill the bastard.

 

Shortly before graduation, the Dean of Blackwood Academy calls her into his study and offers her a mysterious envelope with a black x seal – a mission by the clandestine organization, Black X, an operation so covert that even the president of the United States does not really know of its existence.

 

Her challenge, should she choose to accept it, is to protect the Prince of Montrovia, and to ferret out where the threat on his life originated. And boy, is X up for the challenge! Finally, an opportunity presents itself to join the group that might finally allow her to hunt down her mother’s killer and make him pay.

 

To achieve her mission, she must first get close to the prince. An entire new identity is created for her- she now becomes the sexy and stylish Huntley Von Allister, a girl who recently found out that her “real” father was a billionaire, and that in addition to inheriting a boatload of money, she inherited a brother as well. “Ari” is actually her partner on this case, and the recently dead recluse as their unknown father is their perfect cover story.

 

The partners launch themselves into D.C. high society, with the hopes of forming friendships that will give them access to the prince. Their plan works, both of them sleeping their way a little bit closer to the royal they are charged to protect. Tumbling into the bed of an Olympic athlete/vice president’s son wasn’t exactly a chore, and if it gets Huntley nearer to her mark, then so be it.

 

With her wits and beauty, Huntley catches Prince Lorenzo’s attention nearly as soon as they arrive in the wealthy coastal country of Montrovia. As the two get closer, it becomes alarmingly difficult to remain emotionally unattached, as her training demands. Still, her swirling feelings don’t cloud her judgement badly enough to prevent her from stopping multiple assassination attempts on the prince’s life.

 

There’s no room on this mission for romantic nonsense, but all the expert training in the world couldn’t have prepared her for the emotions she’s feeling towards both the prince and the vice president’s son. As she hops from fast race cars to vast yachts, she fights to protect both the prince and her true identity as she desperately tries to uncover the truth before it’s too late.

 

Rating:

Four out of five chickadees singing!

 

Bonus Points For:

Global politics done well

Kick ass female heroine who refreshingly thinks she’s beautiful and talented (we all know I love this type of heroine after my review of The Vampire Academy)

Believable shadowy government (non-government?) agency

Fast cars, yuppy yachts, gorgeous clothes and glittering jewels, and fancy-pants techy spy gadgets that I wish were real life (or are they already real life?!)

Settings that felt so real I wanted to reach out and touch fabrics or grip guns

 

Downers:

Love triangle (sorry, not sorry, 98% of the time this kind of romantic trope bugs the crap out of me)

Less than fully developed secondary characters (X/Calliope/Huntley is the only character that I felt was fully fleshed out)

Maybe TOO much mystery behind the agency Huntley works for? I’m not sure if I’m annoyed because it is JUST the right amount, or because I can’t figure it out. It’s hard to say.

Unrealistic casual sex- I love me some sexy times, but in the beginning, it made Huntley sound like she enjoyed a varied sex life, and then she randomly wouldn’t (*spoiler!*) sleep with the prince even though she wanted to? Suddenly I felt like the author was forcing Huntley to do (or in this case, not do) something that felt inauthentic for her character.

 

Notes for Folks:

Story contains sexy times, violence, under-age drinking, gambling, etc. It would probably be best enjoyed by those 16 and older.

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