Invisible Women

Invisible Women Feature

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We are excited to be featuring Sarah Long’s Invisible Women book today and have a blog post from the author herself!

Invisible Women Summary

(from Goodreads) Isn’t it about time we talked about YOU?

Tessa, Sandra and Harriet have been best friends through first crushes, careers, marriage and the trials of motherhood. After twenty years of taking care of everyone else’s every need, they’ve found themselves hitting the big 5-0 and suddenly asking themselves: ‘what about me?!’

Sandra has a sordid secret, and Harriet is landed with her ailing mother-in-law. Tessa is looking for something to fill the gaping hole left by her youngest daughter’s departure for uni, where it seems she’s now engaged in all sorts of unsavoury activities, if Tessa’s obsessive late-night Facebook stalking is anything to go by.

When Tessa impulsively responds to an online message from an old flame, she soon finds herself waiting at Heathrow Airport for The One That Got Away. 

But what will the plane from New York bring her? The man of her dreams, or a whole heap of trouble? 

And could this be the long-awaited moment for Tessa to seize her life, for herself, with both hands?

 Invisible Women FC

 

Do women invest too much time and worry into bringing up their children?

 Post by Sarah Long

It often seems to me that bringing up children consists of lurching from one crisis to another. There’s always something to worry about. It must have been marvellous in the old days to hand them over to nanny to live in a separate wing if you were rich, or let them look after each other if you were poor. It was enough if they survived childhood, which was an achievement in itself in the pre-antibiotic era.

 

Instead of which, we are encouraged to worry about everything. Polishing their little CVs from infancy to ensure their cognitive and social skills are fully sharpened for the battle ahead. Violin practice, basketball tournaments, Mandarin lessons, the timetable is packed with must-have bolt-ons.

 

This is very annoying for the averagely lazy mother. We have fond memories of making mud pies in the garden and burning  holes in planks of wood – and the occasional ant – with a magnifying glass (how they’d scream about that nowadays). It was enough for us. Read a book if you’re bored. Just don’t expect me to ferry you to mini-Karate and junior chess tournaments.

 

At least if you go out to work you are partially off the hook. The real brunt of all this ‘add-on’ stuff falls on that martyred creature, the Full-Time Mother, whose achievements are measured through the prism of her child’s accomplishments. Getting up at dawn to take little Johnny to a fencing competition, ensuring he has an imaginvative birthday party to raise the bar for other parents, prepping him for his entrance exams. And when he doesn’t get into the school you’d hoped for, it will be you, not him, who feels wretched. You suspect it’s your fault, if you’d been more successful in your career as a full-time mother, then little Johnny would be blithely set on his path to adult fulfilment.

 

The three mothers in my novel INVISIBLE WOMEN all gave up their careers to become full-time mothers and are now wondering what to do with themselves now the children have grown up. They all agree they wouldn’t change anything, they loved their years at home with their families. But they do wonder at how ‘the few years off while they are young’ morphed into two decades. After all that time putting their children first, it’s time to think about themselves. Reinvention comes in different ways for each of them, but one thing’s for sure – this time, it’s all about them.

INVISIBLE WOMEN by Sarah Long is published by Bonnier Zaffre

Author Sarah Long

Sarah+Long+photo

*Images and blog post provided to me as part of the blog tour

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