The Good Girlfriend’s Guide to Getting Even Book Review

The Good Girlfriend’s Guide to Getting Even

By Anna Bell

Genre: Chick Lit

Read my review of another Anna Bell book here.

4 out of 5 chickadees singing!

I received a copy of this book from the publisher and am voluntarily reviewing it.

This book was pretty hilarious and had quite a few moments where I was chuckling out loud and my husband looked at me like I was crazy! In this novel, Lexi finds out her sports-obsessed boyfriend, Will, skipped out on her close friend’s wedding to attend a sporting event! Will doesn’t know that Lexi knows, so she decides to get even with him before she confronts him. She decides that she will make him miss some sporting events for revenge. Lexi is also trying to become an author so when she has an assignment in her writing class to start a blog, she ends up writing about her attempts to “get even.”

One thing I thought could be improved upon would be to make Lexi more likable, as I started feeling so bad for Will, and eventually got annoyed with her deception. The second thing was that the book was also pretty predictable, as I figured out the ending of the book pretty quickly. These were minor critiques and I still really enjoyed the book.

This is a great, fluffy chick lit mixed with some humor and some romance. I liked that there was somewhat of a secondary love interest character for Lexi. That was an interesting subplot. When the story ends, there are a few fun “extras” at the end of the book- one is an article written by Lexi about what to do if your significant other is sport’s obsessed. I would recommend this book to ANY fan of chick lit!

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336 Hours Book Tour

336 Hours Tour Banner

We are excited to be featuring the awesome book, 336 Hours, today! Scroll down for my review of this relatable, heartwarming, yet funny, story! At the bottom of this post, you can enter a giveaway to win the book for FREE!

336 Hours

By Rachel Cathan

Genre: ‘Based on the author’s true life experiences, 336 Hours is a humorous and poignant diary about one woman’s quest to be a mother.’

Release Date: 13th February 2017

Publisher: SilverWood Books

The next 336 hours will be tough. No, the next 336 hours will be really tough…

I feel like an Olympian, waiting to see whether the years of hard work, sacrifice and dedication are finally going to pay off, or whether my body is about to fail me at the last hurdle and make me wonder why I ever hoped I could win.

My best friend is pregnant, my single friends are planning their pregnancies and, after five long years of tests and investigations, I’m coming to the end of my third – and supposedly final – IVF treatment. There are 336 hours to survive before I’ll know if I get to join the motherhood club. That’s 224 waking hours of pure psychological torture. 112 sleeping hours to stare at the ceiling and wonder, what the hell am I going to do with my life if it turns out I can’t have kids?

Based on the author’s true life experiences, 336 Hours is a humorous and poignant diary about one woman’s quest to be a mother.

Extract 1:
They should have IVF farms for women like me to book into at times like these; pretty padded cells with flat-screen TVs and row upon row of feel-good DVDs and relaxation CDs, and beautiful gardens and luxury bathrooms with hot taps that would never heat up to embryo boiling temperatures, and gigantic rocking chairs so that we could legitimately sit and rock ourselves backwards and forwards for hours on end without looking completely crazy in the process.

Extract 2:
I can’t pretend to have a clue what she means, of course. I don’t know what it’s like to have little people shouting, ‘Mummy! Mummy! MUUMMEEE!’ all day long, to never be able to go for a wee on your own, to make spaghetti bolognese and then watch your dinner dates tip it straight over their heads, to stay up all night comforting a teething toddler, to spend hours coercing and pleading with very small people to put shoes and coats on so you can at last leave the fucking house.

But I want to know this life. Because that stuff gives you stories, first-hand experiences, and the right to exchange knowing smiles of solidarity with other frazzled parents as you all manoeuvre your wayward shopping trolleys around the aisles of Tesco.

And it comes with other stuff, too: the good stuff.

336 Hours cover

My Review

I was given this book as part of a book tour and am voluntarily reviewing it. I thought that this book was amazingly relatable. It details the main character’s struggles with the 336 hours before she discovers if her third IVF treatment has been successful. She and her “DH” (dear husband) have decided this is the final time they will attempt IVF. She details the physical challenges, but more importantly, the emotional ones. What will she do if this treatment isn’t successful? She contemplated a childfree life of travel and wealth. Or will she foster or adopt? If this test is negative, will she really be able to stop trying for a baby?

This book had a few hilarious “dry humor” types of scenes with the physical symptoms that infertility treatment cause. I nearly laughed aloud when she felt so gaseous but couldn’t fart. Brilliant writing about an “improper” topic.

I love books like this that delve into emotional struggles on tough, real-life situations. I think this book is a must-read for anyone struggling with infertility. I also think that people who haven’t struggled with infertility could gain an amazing amount of empathy from reading this story, especially learning what not to say to someone who is childfree. Overall, this is a heartfelt book with the right amount of humor.

Links and Author Info

BUY LINK

AMAZON UK

AMAZON US

Silverwood Books

 

ABOUT RACHEL CATHAN

author pic

RACHEL CATHAN is a writer from Bedfordshire. In 2001, a mutual friend introduced her to a part-time pub DJ in Southend-on-Sea. A month later, they had moved in together, around seven years later they tied the knot, and a little while after that – just like so many couples before them – they made the exciting and terrifying decision to start a family. And then, like a growing number of couples today, well…not a lot happened.

Throughout the subsequent years of fertility investigations and failed treatments, Rachel kept a diary of her experiences, and it’s from these first- hand encounters in the world of infertility and IVF that her first book, 336 Hours has been adapted.

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/336Hours/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rachelcathan

Goodreads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33350325-336-hours?from_search=true.

 

Blog: http://www.rachelcathan.co.uk/rachels-blog/

Website: http://www.rachelcathan.co.uk

Giveaway

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Rome Un-Holiday Book Review

Rome Un-Holiday (Samantha Stone Mystery Book 3)

By Katie Bloomstrom

4 out of 5 stars! I was given this book and am voluntarily reviewing it. This series is what would happen if Becky Bloomwood decided to become a detective! As a thank you for her work in Las Vegas, Leah is taking Sam to Rome with her to relax, see the sights, and attend a movie career. Their time of pampering is quickly ended when Vitale’s (Leah’s grandfather) bodyguard is shot and then Vitale and his ambulance disappear! Sam’s search for Vitale gets more complicated as the case continue.

I, again, love the blog format! It’s so funny to read comments from Sam’s friends back home and random trolls. I love Sam’s mission solving style. It just seems so realistic how she often gets “stuck” and needs help. Luckily, she has hot FBI agent, Eddie, around. I liked seeing their relationship progress, even though the book ended on a bit of a cliffhanger for them.

The characters in here are funny and enjoyable. The plot moved along at a good pace and the mystery makes logical sense. This is a fun read!

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Room Book Review

Room

By Emma Donoghue

4 out of 5 stars! Some spoilers ahead!

When I heard what this book was about, I expected it to be a lot darker than it was. However, this dark story is told from the point of view of young Jack who doesn’t know anything except his situation. He is happy and content with his life.

Five year old Jack lives with Ma in tiny shed. This room is the only world that Jack knows. He thinks that what he sees on the TV are made up stories about other worlds. He views room as it’s own universe. In reality, Ma was kidnapped at age 19 and locked in a garden shed that is inescapable. Her captor abuses her and so Jack is born. 

It was incredible to read about the love and bond that Jack and Ma had. Ma tried to make things as “normal” for Jack as possible. She makes up games from the few objects they have. For example, they thread a string through broken eggshells to make a snake. They do “P.E.” by running around the rug. They stick to a strict routine. I was amazed by Ma’s creativity and resilience. 

Eventually, Ma and Jack escape in a not-so-believable part of the story. I thought this was going to be the main part of the book, but it was actually quite a small part. After this, we read about Ma and Jack adjusting to the real world. I thought that the author did a pretty good job of showing the challenges that Jack would face coming into such a new environment. It seemed like he had sensory processing disorder as well as some OCD. In the room, Jack’s life was extremely small and predictable. His mother and he were never apart because there was no space to be apart! Ma is relieved to be back in the world and wants to move on with life, but Jack misses things about his old life. 

This is an emotional and moving book! If you can handle the “baby talk” Jack often uses, I recommend this story.

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